Higher Education Jobs – Higher Education Recruitment Consortium https://www. Advancing inclusive excellence in the higher education workforce Fri, 27 Mar 上海11选五 00:58:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www./wp-content/uploads/2018/08/cropped-logo_national-32x32.png Higher Education Jobs – Higher Education Recruitment Consortium https://www. 32 32 Being productive while working remotely https://www./being-productive-while-working-remotely/ https://www./being-productive-while-working-remotely/#respond Fri, 27 Mar 上海11选五 00:53:47 +0000 https://www./?p=3217 Remote working is becoming increasingly widespread, as institutions see the benefits of allowing employees to work from 上海11选五 and the huge advantages of hiring talented staff who may not be necessarily located nearby. Even if remote work is not the norm in your organization, in a time of crisis—such as current coronavirus response—the number of... Read More

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Remote working is becoming increasingly widespread, as institutions see the benefits of allowing employees to work from 上海11选五 and the huge advantages of hiring talented staff who may not be necessarily located nearby. Even if remote work is not the norm in your organization, in a time of crisis—such as current coronavirus response—the number of remote workers can skyrocket. So how do remote workers ensure that they are able to stay productive and focused in their new informal surroundings?

Creating physical and mental space for working remotely

When working from 上海11选五, the lines between work and 上海11选五 life can become very blurred—if you let them. It’s all too easy to cook the evening’s dinner on work time, or work in front of the TV with only half focus. It takes discipline and systems to ensure that this doesn’t happen.

One way of acing the separation between “work” and “life” is to create both a physical workspace and a mental workspace. The physical space can be a particular room that you go to for work, or if you don’t have a room, a desk or table dedicated to you during work time. When you are there, you are “at work” and are not to be disturbed.

Harder than a physical space is the mental space. Prepare yourself for the day, so that once you sit down in your workspace, you are there mentally as well. Some top tips include dressing for work, rather than feeling the temptation to work in your PJs, or even “commuting” to work (a short walk around the block and back to your house). Small efforts like these can work wonders for prompting us to mentally click over to work mode.

Scheduling breaks and work time in co-ordination with others

Just as with any form of work, when working remotely, it’s important to take breaks, especially if you are working at a computer screen. If you’re isolated at 上海11选五 due to the coronavirus, you might find yourself missing the camaraderie of your college or university. Schedule virtual time together wherever possible. Consider regular check-ins with a coworker to see how you’re both faring, or group video conferences specifically dedicated to your team’s well-being (beyond work!). Knowing you have a scheduled “water cooler time” for socializing will help motivate you when focus dwindles.

Movement and physical activity

When you work remotely, it’s easy to forget to get up and move around. This can be true of many working situations, but in higher ed, we often move from our office to someone else’s, to a lecture hall, or out and about on a lunch break. At 上海11选五, we can neglect to do this.

Take time to move when you find your energy levels dip. Get away from your work space to dance, run on the spot, go for a walk, or stretch; whatever it takes to wake you up and get you back in the zone.

Self-discipline

When you are entirely accountable for what you do for the day, and you have no colleagues or supervisor present to keep you focused, it’s possible that you may start to lack motivation and productivity will dip. To combat this, you need to put systems in place to make sure that doesn’t happen. Offer yourself little rewards when, and only when, you have completed a task. This might be a break with someone else in your 上海11选五, a coffee (and cake), a phone call, or anything that will get you through.

Another great tip is to use “chunking.” Give yourself blocks of time to work in and stick to them. Set a timer for 20 minutes and work solidly without any interference or distractions from social media. At the end of the 20 minutes, you can take a short break.

Conclusion

Remote working can take a bit of getting used to, but once you get into the right habits and have the right mindset, you’ll adapt to it quickly. Hopefully, you’ll learn to love the freedom and autonomy it brings.

About the author:  is a Career Coach and owner of From Kids to Career, which was set up to support women who are returning to a career, or looking to move in a new direction after taking time out to raise a family. Nikki works with Mums to find their true passions and to re-build confidence that can be lost after a break from the workplace. She believes passionately that being a parent does not put you at the bottom of the pile when it comes to your career. Nikki owns CV writing company Confident CV and has 8 years’ experience working in Careers for Cardiff University and works as a writer. Most recently, Nikki is writing content for businesses, organizations, and individuals on how to transition to remote working. She also coaches and delivers online training on this subject.

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Tips for higher education professionals working from 上海11选五 https://www./tips-for-higher-education-professionals-working-from-上海11选五-during-coronavirus/ https://www./tips-for-higher-education-professionals-working-from-上海11选五-during-coronavirus/#respond Thu, 19 Mar 上海11选五 21:20:48 +0000 https://www./?p=3209 Most higher education faculty, staff, and administrators aren’t fully accustomed to remote work. But the spread of coronavirus has prompted thousands of higher education employees to adapt to this new way of working, which is unfamiliar to many of us and brings a new set of challenges, especially for those of us working when family... Read More

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Portrait of happy mature man with white, grey stylish short beard looking at camera outdoors

Most higher education faculty, staff, and administrators aren’t fully accustomed to remote work. But the spread of coronavirus has prompted thousands of higher education employees to adapt to this new way of working, which is unfamiliar to many of us and brings a new set of challenges, especially for those of us working when family members are unexpectedly at 上海11选五, too.

Here are some tips on how to work productively and comfortably at 上海11选五.

Embrace the change

The coronavirus pandemic has brought tremendous change for everyone. Working from 上海11选五, whether in isolation or with family at 上海11选五 with you, may not be an easy transition. Now is the time for forward thinking.

You may need to develop new ways to make sure you are working effectively, especially since remote work doesn’t always lend itself well to student-facing roles. If you are a lecturer, you will not be able to run face-to-face lectures, so what can you do instead? Consider creative ways to communicate with students, like holding virtual “office hours.” If you are a researcher, what can you do from your desk instead of in the field? Perhaps there’s a project you’d normally focus on during a different time of the year, which lends itself to making a start on now.

You may need to shift your focus entirely and look at new areas of work, for example, writing new courses, marketing future events, or making professional connections.

Make use of technology

Meetings can continue online or via phone. Group calls are possible on a variety of software platforms, including Zoom, GoToMeeting, and Google Hangouts. to facilitate virtual meetings; many software companies are extending free trials of their conferencing software. Your institution likely has subscriptions to conference calling software, so make sure you check those options before embarking on your own.

Educators throughout the world are shifting to online teaching. Instructors can conduct seminars via videoconferencing software, or pre-record and distribute lectures via either video or voice recording. Tools such as Blackboard can host more interactive sessions, and professors can also add lectures, workshops, and resources to shared university drives. Professors should be sure to keep the accessibility needs of their students top-of-mind.

Networking sites such as provide a great way of building connections and making relationships with other professionals that may prove useful once normal work resumes.

Social elements

One of the hardest things about working from 上海11选五 is social isolation. Unfortunately, coronavirus has made physical social isolation necessary. However, this does not mean we have to feel alone, not connecting with anyone. As above, there are a number of ways that we can stay in contact with colleagues and students without meeting them in person. This is vital to keeping us productive and also for our own well-being. Don’t lose contact with people during this difficult time.

Structure your day

Similar to your workplace routine, give yourself a structure to your day. This will make you more productive, more focused, and will give some much-needed certainty to your life. When it feels like everything is up in the air, you have the power to keep some structure. A schedule can promote calm, reduces stress, and help us to have something concrete to work around. While you may need some flexibility in your approach if you have others at 上海11选五, make sure you set work times, as well as family time and downtime.

Define your workspace

Set up a workspace area so that you and everyone else in your house knows that when you enter that space, you are in work mode. This will help you to get into the right mindset to work and also set boundaries with the rest of your family, who may be at 上海11选五 with you.

Take care of yourself

Working from 上海11选五 can be isolating or, if you are doing so when the rest of your family is 上海11选五 with you, very stressful. Take regular breaks and factor in downtime so that you do not suffer burn out. During stressful times, you have to look after your own well-being, so make sure you’re taking time out to do things that ground you, no matter how simple. Consider going for a walk, reading a book, listening to a podcast, or a short exercise regime. Whatever your “breaks” are, factor them in for the sake of your mental health.

Author: is a Career Coach and owner of From Kids to Career, which was set up to support women who are returning to a career, or looking to move in a new direction after taking time out to raise a family. Nikki works with Mums to find their true passions and to re-build confidence that can be lost after a break from the workplace. She believes passionately that being a parent does not put you at the bottom of the pile when it comes to your career. Nikki owns CV writing company Confident CV and has 8 years’ experience working in Careers for Cardiff University and works as a writer. Most recently, Nikki is writing content for businesses, organizations, and individuals on how to transition to remote working. She also coaches and delivers online training on this subject.

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What can a sabbatical do for your career? https://www./what-can-a-sabbatical-do-for-your-career/ https://www./what-can-a-sabbatical-do-for-your-career/#respond Fri, 21 Feb 上海11选五 07:13:27 +0000 https://www./?p=3159 Content from our partners at Sabbatical上海11选五s.com Why take a Sabbatical? The word “sabbatical” comes from the Old Testament concept of the Sabbath or Shabat, and while religions today interpret a holy day or day of rest in different ways, it is clear that the human need for regular rest and appreciation is nearly universal. Today,... Read More

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Content from our partners at

Why take a Sabbatical?

The word “sabbatical” comes from the Old Testament concept of the Sabbath or Shabat, and while religions today interpret a holy day or day of rest in different ways, it is clear that the human need for regular rest and appreciation is nearly universal.

Today, many academics are accustomed to the idea of sabbaticals, a key perk of attaining tenure. Sabbaticals were traditionally based on taking one year of sabbatical leave for every seven years of tenured work, but it has become more common in academia to take a 6-month sabbatical after every three and half years of work.

While not everyone in higher education is a tenured professor, anyone working in academia can greatly benefit from taking a sabbatical. The benefits of being away from, and then coming back into, your regular life—with a reinvigorated and usually more global perspective—are undeniable.

What can a sabbatical do for you professionally and personally?

While some sabbaticals may have a research or writing focus, some people plan a sabbatical or an extended break from their regular schedule to consider a career transition. It is helpful to have some time to process career goals, whether that means looking for a more challenging job in your current field, changing fields, or going back to school for an advanced degree.

Lyndall Farley, founder of Beyond a Break, notes that “the length of a sabbatical is different country上海11选五 to country上海11选五. My general rule is that a sabbatical is double the length of your annual leave allowance,” meaning that a sabbatical will feel like real break if it is at least double your regular time off. In her experience of taking periodic sabbaticals during her professional life, she has found this is the minimum duration most people need to really decompress and immerse themselves in the focus of their sabbatical.

This time away from your accustomed environment allows you to experience different perspectives, share ideas with new people, and reinvigorate your mind. While many enjoy the stimulating nature of traveling to other countries, others crave time alone in a peaceful, natural setting. The beauty of a sabbatical is that the focus can be completely personalized to your goals, budget, and time frame.  Read on for inspiring ideas of what people experience while on leave.

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1.    Complete a professional project

Quote from Professor Nigel Smith overlaid on a library. The quote reads, "It was so fortunate to find somewhere that really resonated with my project. I would also say that you much greatly respect the place in which you stay, and your host."

Many of Sabbatical上海11选五s.com’s members find accommodations in other cities or countries to  dedicate themselves to a project related to that destination. Princeton Professor Nigel Smith stayed in Jane Boyd’s Amsterdam flat for three summers while writing his forthcoming book, Polyglot Poetics: Transnational Early Modern Literature, which “involves the comparison of English with literatures in other European languages (especially Dutch, German, French and Spanish) in the context of political and religious transformation between 1500 and 1800.”

As a visiting professor at Huygens Instituut, part of the Royal Dutch Academy, Professor Smith had access to the libraries and archives to conduct research for his book. He also worked closely with colleagues in the Netherlands. Living in Amsterdam for longer stretches of time was crucial for his research.

Staying in Jane Boyd’s flat was the perfect writing retreat. The 上海11选五 created a separation from Professor Smith’s regular surroundings to allow him to focus on the book. Professor Smith and his wife have found their summers in Amsterdam to be professionally productive as well as personally satisfying. They love the art, the architecture, the music and the food of where they stay in Amsterdam, and all of that has added up to a series of meaningful sabbaticals.  

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2.    Recalibrate work/life balance

A person holding a coffee cup with a book in her lap

As technology has advanced and the pace of life has increased, the lines between our professional and personal lives have blurred, and many people are using sabbaticals as a way to re-set. This concept of a timed resting period is especially critical for people who have demanding jobs, as well as family or personal responsibilities.

After seven years of heading up a three-campus community college in Maryland along with juggling family life, President DeRionne P. Pollard was “getting a little burned out.” The Chronicle of Higher Education profiled how her helped her reboot and refocus on her 上海11选五 life. Having the time to do that allowed Pollard to come back to her job with a renewed sense of excitement and commitment, something almost anyone can appreciate!

Many Sabbatical上海11选五s.com members find that even if their sabbatical has a professional focus and isn’t designed purely for R&R, just living in a different environment is a change of pace that opens their minds in new ways.

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3.    Collaborate across cultures

Edward Kaufman and Manuel Hassassian stand back-to-back, smiling, in front of a bookshelf

One of the best aspects of academic life is connecting with other people who have dedicated their professional lives to the same subject area. Many Sabbatical上海11选五s.com members explore the full benefit of teaching, conducting research, or collaborating on a book or film with a colleague in another city or country上海11选五. Even with all of the email and videoconferencing we have at our fingertips today, face-to-face communication remains extremely valuable.

A unique and inspiring example of this are two Sabbatical上海11选五s.com members who have collaborated on teaching a class each summer since 1993. Edward “Edy” Kaufman (photo at right), a recognized scholar of Israel, and Manuel Hassassian (photo at left), a recognized academic in Palestine, team-teach “Conflict Resolution: The Israeli-Palestinian Experiment” each summer at the University of Maryland.

The professors’ ongoing work speaks to the role of academia in fostering dialogue and conflict resolution. Every year, the class has adapted to the changing political climate in the region. The class offers students the narratives of both sides of the conflict, what they have learned about conflict resolution, and their reflections on whether a peaceful conflict is possible.

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4.    Immerse Yourself in the History of Another Country

Author and historian Julie Peakman (photo below) first visited the Greek island of Leros at age 17 and fell in love with the place. She had always dreamed of owning a 上海11选五 of her own on Leros, and was able to do that as an adult. Her time in Greece has inspired her to research extensively and write about those who defended the island during World War II in her book, Hitler’s Island War:

A close-up headshot of Julie Peakman looking forward

“I started with trying to trace the soldiers who had fought in the Battle of Leros all those years ago. It was a hard job and took some time. I wrote to military museums of the regiments involved, I wrote on military forums, I tracked people who were at the Leros vets reunion…few of them were still alive. They lived up and down the country上海11选五 so I travelled about with my tape recorder interviewing as many of them as I could.

“It was an honor to meet them. Many of them had never shared their story with anyone, not even their closest family. They all seemed to know that this was their last chance to tell their story. I just hope I have done them justice.”

Through her work, Peakman has brought to life little-known stories of soldiers fighting for democracy in a place she loves. She became part of the Sabbatical上海11选五s.com family because she is an author and knows so many writers who might not yet be financially successful, but who need to have access to libraries and archives in other countries. 

Taking a sabbatical to do this research can make all the difference to someone who has invested their time and energy into a project, and being in the country上海11选五 while delving into the research gives an irreplaceable sense of time and place to a book, especially historical works.

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5.    Dedicate yourself to a passion project

Michael Stromme holding a child, both are smiling widely

Sabbatical上海11选五s.com member Michael Stromme has used the site to find trustworthy tenants for his 上海11选五 in New York, while he dedicates his time in Uganda, working with “a variety of charitable organizations that provide vulnerable children with food, education, and emotional support.”

Stromme, a social entrepreneur, has founded an NGO called LIFT (Lives Impacted for a Future Together) in Kampala, Uganda. Since the country上海11选五 is rich in agriculture and has many oily plants, he is working on developing a line of essential oils to be sold to local high-end boutique hotels and spas. He uses the profits from the essential oils (adding handmade soaps in the future) to fund his NGO and the needs of the children he works with.

In effect, Michael’s sabbatical has become his new job. As he worked more and more with the kids, he realized he had the skill set and passion to create something that would “leave this world a little better than how you found it.”

Related:

Exploring Future Sabbaticals

If these ideas inspire you, it might be the year for you to plan an extended trip or sabbatical!  that sabbaticals positively impact professional productivity and creativity and improves overall mental and physical health, so if this is the year for you, start exploring the possible places you can find temporary accommodations or tenants for your 上海11选五 on .

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Webinar: Preparing for a Successful Higher Education Job Interview https://www./webinar-preparing-for-a-successful-higher-education-job-interview/ https://www./webinar-preparing-for-a-successful-higher-education-job-interview/#respond Fri, 10 Jan 上海11选五 01:24:42 +0000 https://www./?p=3092 You’ve done your research, sent in your application, and landed a job interview–congratulations! You may be asking yourself: Now what? Through this webinar, you’ll discover best practices for preparing for a successful job interview, as well as the particular quirks and “etiquette” of the higher education interview process. Learn how to evaluate workplace culture to... Read More

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You’ve done your research, sent in your application, and landed a job interview–congratulations!

You may be asking yourself: Now what?

Through this , you’ll discover best practices for preparing for a successful job interview, as well as the particular quirks and “etiquette” of the higher education interview process. Learn how to evaluate workplace culture to assess if you would thrive at a prospective workplace. You’ll also receive advice on what to ask (and what not to ask!) your prospective employer.

This webinar is presented by Sharon Justice, SPHR, Teaching Instructor at East Carolina University’s College of Business and principal of Justice Leadership.

from on .

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Telling Your Story When Applying for Higher Ed Jobs https://www./upcoming-webinar-telling-your-story-when-applying-for-higher-ed-jobs/ https://www./upcoming-webinar-telling-your-story-when-applying-for-higher-ed-jobs/#respond Tue, 07 Jan 上海11选五 01:30:40 +0000 https://www./?p=3084 How can you define, and confidently communicate, your professional story to land your ideal job? Learn how to tell your story through this engaging webinar led by Sharon Justice, SPHR, Teaching Instructor at East Carolina University’s College of Business and principal of Justice Leadership. The webinar covers how to draft compelling impact and achievement statements,... Read More

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How can you define, and confidently communicate, your professional story to land your ideal job? Learn how to tell your story through this engaging webinar led by Sharon Justice, SPHR, Teaching Instructor at East Carolina University’s College of Business and principal of Justice Leadership.

The webinar covers how to draft compelling impact and achievement statements, format your CV or resume, and create a professional online presence. The webinar addresses how to use this information to prepare for interviews, and how to “pitch” yourself to prospective employers via job applications. 

Captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing is provided by CaptionAccess for all HERC webinars. Transcripts available upon request. Photo credit: Gender Spectrum Collection.

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Higher education job search tips for older employees https://www./higher-education-job-search-tips-for-older-employees/ https://www./higher-education-job-search-tips-for-older-employees/#respond Sat, 14 Dec 2019 00:03:35 +0000 https://www./?p=3044 “Teaching and learning have always been intergenerational processes,” shares Dr. Heather Wallace, Assistant Professor for the Public Health program at Grand Valley State University. “Older employees have plenty to offer the higher education workplace.” Dr. Wallace, an interdisciplinary scholar with degrees in Sociology, Public Health, and Gerontology, shares advice for older adults navigating the higher... Read More

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“Teaching and learning have always been intergenerational processes,” shares Dr. Heather Wallace, Assistant Professor for the Public Health program at Grand Valley State University. “Older employees have plenty to offer the higher education workplace.”

Dr. Wallace, an interdisciplinary scholar with degrees in Sociology, Public Health, and Gerontology, shares advice for older adults navigating the higher education workplace.

In a competitive job market, how can senior job seekers highlight their skills? 

Figure out how to tell your story.

Ask yourself: Who are you? Why are you applying to this particular job? What can you contribute? A prospective employer shouldn’t have to ask the “right questions” to draw out this information. Offer to submit a portfolio of your work highlighting evidence of your qualifications. If you create this portfolio preemptively—regardless of whether an employer wants to see it—you’ll build your confidence.

In a cover letter or interview, draw from your years of experience to illustrate why you’re a great fit for the position: “As an experienced project manager, I think that would be an asset to your organization because…” “I solved a similar challenge by…”

Practice your interview skills with intergenerational friends and family.

People of different generations tend to approach interviews entirely differently. Conduct a few mock interviews with family members or friends to brush up on your interview skills. A mock interview can help you identify what your strengths are and prepare to bring them to the forefront.

Any job search can be a long and arduous road. What self-care tactics do you recommend for senior job seekers?

Take time for personal reflection.

Do some deep—and sometimes uncomfortable—reflections about your expectations and ideas. Do you expect to be recognized for your wealth of experience and background? What happens if you aren’t? How will you handle having a boss who’s younger than you? Know what your expectations are, and what biases and perceptions you may bring to the table. Self-awareness may help you avoid a stressful situation. It can also help you boost your confidence to define what you want, and then empower you to find the right opportunity.

Have mentors and friends.

Find a peer who’s been successful in their job search, as an older person who’s transitioned into a higher education career. Talk to them candidly about your strengths and weaknesses.

Acknowledge that ageism is an issue.

A friend of mine is a former university dean. She shared: “When I turned 70, I felt like I became invisible.” Her experience, unfortunately, is not unique. In the workplace, older adults face assumptions that they lack technological skills and are not trainable or retrainable.

If you’re feeling fearful and lacking confidence (which you hopefully found out in your reflection), or you’re frustrated with not getting anywhere in your job search, channel that into, “I have heard that sometimes people are pushed out of their positions because of age. How does your institution deal with it?” Put it out there, and have a candid conversation with a prospective employer. is a great resource on challenging ageism.

Take care of yourself.

Everyone experiences frustration. Don’t get down on yourself because you think you’re “too old.” The friend that I mentioned above is still teaching, well into her 80s. Don’t buy into the stereotypes that you’re not valuable. You have something to contribute! Just figure out how to make it obvious to prospective employers.

Learn why older employees should consider careers in higher ed.

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“A lifetime of learning”: Why older employees should consider higher ed careers https://www./a-lifetime-of-learning-why-older-employees-should-consider-higher-ed-careers/ https://www./a-lifetime-of-learning-why-older-employees-should-consider-higher-ed-careers/#respond Fri, 13 Dec 2019 02:02:45 +0000 https://www./?p=3034 Higher education institutions have always benefited from the wisdom and experience of older adults, whether in the classroom, faculty, staff, or administration. Yet higher education also offers older employees intellectual stimulation, a sense of belonging, flexibility, and opportunities to transmit lived experiences to the next generation of leaders. Dr. Heather Wallace serves as Assistant Professor... Read More

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Higher education institutions have always benefited from the wisdom and experience of older adults, whether in the classroom, faculty, staff, or administration. Yet higher education also offers older employees intellectual stimulation, a sense of belonging, flexibility, and opportunities to transmit lived experiences to the next generation of leaders.

Dr. Heather Wallace serves as Assistant Professor for the Public Health program at Grand Valley State University, where she advises and teaches students in Health Promotion. Her expertise lies in health and aging. Here, Dr. Wallace shares the unique benefits that higher education institutions offer older employees.

Built-in opportunities for personal and professional growth

Higher education offers employees ample channels for cultural and intellectual engagement. College campuses also host ballets, art exhibits, even farmers’ markets. Higher ed also offers employees a rich slate of professional development opportunities, including continuing education. It’s not coincidental that the best-ranked cities to retire, like Bloomington, Indiana, are often places with major higher ed institutions. When older employees work in higher ed, they’re not simply punching a time card, but experiencing an engaging lifestyle.

A sense of community

At my university, we offer communities of practice, including one for retirees. The topics range from saving for retirement to owning a dog. Learning communities like this buffer against loneliness and isolation, which are some of the biggest risk factors for older adults.

Flexibility

Many older adults are searching for flexibility in their jobs. They don’t want to have to work a year to earn three years’ vacation time; they may have family obligations. Higher education is a great place to find flexible positions that value work-life satisfaction.

Opportunities for meaningful mentorship

While higher education institutions are in the business of educating adults to go into the workforce, they’re also in the business of providing personal and intellectual growth to their students. There’s a lot of evidence that students are hungry for this sense of personal development. Younger generations are not getting as much from organized religion like previous generations did, and they’re turning to other social structures, like CrossFit.

Older adults are the only ones who can offer true, firsthand guidance on experienced personal and intellectual growth. They have adapted to so much change—think about the people who were working in the post office with the advent of email. We can all learn from people who have navigated massive technological and societal shifts. If we, in higher ed, can learn to harness this, we can give students not only degrees but opportunities to grow as human beings.

Ready to take the leap into a rewarding higher ed career? Read Dr. Wallace’s tips for senior job seekers in higher ed.

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What is Imposter Syndrome and how can you overcome it? https://www./what-is-imposter-syndrome-and-how-can-you-overcome-it/ https://www./what-is-imposter-syndrome-and-how-can-you-overcome-it/#respond Fri, 22 Nov 2019 03:23:51 +0000 https://www./?p=3013 Imposter Syndrome is a psychological phenomenon whereby a person has serious doubts about their accomplishments. It’s an inability to believe that what you have achieved is due to you and not some form of “luck” or misunderstanding. If you have Imposter Syndrome, you may feel that your success is not truly “yours,” and you may... Read More

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Imposter Syndrome is a psychological phenomenon whereby a person has serious doubts about their accomplishments. It’s an inability to believe that what you have achieved is due to you and not some form of “luck” or misunderstanding. If you have Imposter Syndrome, you may feel that your success is not truly “yours,” and you may dread being uncovered as the fraud you believe you are.

Can you relate?

Have you achieved success and for a while, felt like it wasn’t deserved? Have you ever got a new job and felt out of your depth and a fraud for being in that position? I know I have.

When I first started working for myself as a Careers Coach, I felt like a total fake, even though I had been doing the job confidently as an employee for many years. I felt uncomfortable charging people for my time and had such low confidence in my abilities. For a while, I was surprised and anxious when people wanted my services. It was only over time and through positive feedback from clients that I realised this wasn’t true at all. My success was due to my abilities and wasn’t just “luck.”

Imposter Syndrome is incredibly common, with more than 70% of people experiencing it at some time. Even great minds like Albert Einstein and talent like Meryl Streep may have suffered from Imposter Syndrome.

What are the results of Imposter Syndrome?

If we let Imposter Syndrome get the better of us, it can have a significant effect on our growth and development. Symptoms can show up as a high level of stress, a loss of confidence, a fear of failure, and severe anxiety, which can prevent us from moving forward with anything new or challenging.

To overcome Imposter Syndrome, it’s very important that we can internalize our accomplishments and celebrate them, challenge limiting beliefs, and show off our strengths.

When you next feel like Imposter Syndrome is creeping in, ask yourself these questions:

What successes have I had in the past that prove I can do this task?

Often, Imposter Syndrome is simply ignoring or refusing to acknowledge our achievements. To answer this question, make a real or mental list of all the things you’ve achieved, as well as the skills and qualities you have that drove you to this success. This will help you see that it isn’t just luck that got you to where you are. You have real, tangible proof.

Which beliefs about success are holding me back?

Do you have limiting beliefs about yourself and your abilities? To answer this question, think about your beliefs around success. Ask yourself what you think you need to be/do to be successful. Are these beliefs stopping you from recognizing your success? For example, do you believe you need a certain qualification that you don’t have to be a success in your job? Is this really the case? Challenge your beliefs and lose those that aren’t serving you.

What are my strengths?

Often, Imposter Syndrome causes us to focus on our weaknesses rather than our strengths. Thinking about all that you’re good at can help counteract this. Take 5 minutes to brainstorm all of your strengths.

Am I really a fraud or is this just a passing insecurity?

I’m sure you already know the answer to this, but it’s important that you acknowledge that you’re feeling insecurity and own that, rather than look for reasons to “prove” that you are an imposter. Realize that everyone has moments where they are low in confidence and that you are not alone. In light of your accomplishments, accept that your insecurities are not facts, and you’ll be able to take steps to change your thinking.

About the Author:  is a Career Coach and owner of From Kids to Career, which was set up to support women who are returning to a career, or looking to move in a new direction after taking time out to raise a family. Nikki works with Mums to find their true passions and to re-build confidence that can be lost after a break from the workplace. She believes passionately that being a parent does not put you at the bottom of the pile when it comes to your career. Nikki owns CV writing company Confident CV and has 8 years’ experience working in Careers for Cardiff University.

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Leading Diverse Teams in Higher Ed https://www./leading-diverse-teams-in-higher-ed/ https://www./leading-diverse-teams-in-higher-ed/#respond Fri, 22 Nov 2019 01:05:57 +0000 https://www./?p=3003 Higher education departments and teams are more diverse than ever.  But now what? How can managers lead these vibrantly diverse teams most effectively? How can leaders best utilize the unique perspectives of their team members to improve the effectiveness of the group as a whole?  Experts agree that creating inclusive teams is just good business. “We’re starting to see more... Read More

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Higher education departments and teams are more diverse than ever.  But now what? How can managers lead these vibrantly diverse teams most effectively? How can leaders best utilize the unique perspectives of their team members to improve the effectiveness of the group as a whole? 

Experts agree that creating inclusive teams is just good business. “We’re starting to see more and more data that shows quite convincingly that organizations that are made up of people from diverse backgrounds can outproduce more monolithic organizations,” says @Isaac Dixon, PhD., Associate Vice President for Human Resources at Portland State University and a member of HERC’s Advisory Board. “Colleges and universities in the United States are no exception.”

@Esmilda Abreu-Hornbostel, Ph.D., Title IX Coordinator and Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs at the Pratt Institute, agrees. “When you combine diversity, equity, inclusion, we notice that those diverse teams that are composed that way outperform non-diverse teams by about 35%.”


How to Effectively Lead Diverse Teams

There are critical steps managers must take to develop these high performing teams. Often the key steps begin during the recruitment process and can extend outside of the campus’ gates.

Step 1 – Be Honest

“You have to start out with a real frank assessment of your culture. If your area has some work to do in certain things like, ‘There aren’t a lot of great soul food places around here,’ tell people that. What gets people is when they feel like they bought one thing and it turns out to be something else,” warns Dr. Dixon.

He says that painting accurate pictures of the cultural reality new hires will face not only gives them an accurate view of the environment, but communicates that you’re aware of the challenges they will face.

Step 2 – Take a Multi-pronged Approach

Dr. Dixon’s recommendation is part of a three-pronged approach Dr. Abreu encourages managers to adopt, including considering the personal, interpersonal, and cultural:

“It’s called the social, emotional, and ethical learning model. It looks at the way in which my personal awareness informs how I do my job. Then there’s the social domain, my interpersonal awareness—how do I work with others? And finally there’s the systemic domain, and that’s how I navigate systems or culture.”

Dr. Abreu says managers often understand the personal and interpersonal dynamics of teams, but fail to understand their cultural dynamics. Understanding all three, however, is critical to a team’s ultimate success.

Step 3 – Be a Learner

Dr. Abreu argues that having “a more integral leadership style where you are purposely pulling in people and their information” ensures that a team thrives.

Dr. Dixon concurs that managers should engage “the entire team in decision-making whenever possible” and request input: “Practice active listening and ask people more questions than you try to provide answers.” This willingness to ask and learn enables the manager and the team to grow in understanding and cohesion.

Step 4 – Get a Mentor

Managers should seek to learn outside of their teams as well. “If there’s someone at an institution that’s doing this well, spend time with them and observe and learn from talking with them, “ asserts Dr. Dixon. “Let that person be your diversity mentor.” Mentors can model ideal behavior and teach you lessons that mitigate your learning curve and help you manage the growing pains your team will inevitably experience.  Dr. Abreu  agrees: “We can all benefit from a constellation of mentors, each with their own experiences and expertise.” 

Misconceptions to Avoid

Experts say that disagreement and conflict are growing pains inherent in leading a productive diverse team in any environment.

Some of the misconceptions, Dr. Dixon begins, are “that it’s going to happen quicker than it does; and that there will be no failures, hiccups, or pain associated with transformation.” He encourages team leaders to expect change to happen slowly and over time. “The reality is that we’re human beings and no significant change in organization or culture happens quickly.”

If your team is currently facing difficulties, know you’re on the right track. Continue growing and learning together. Seek out mentors, together. If you persevere, you will become a part of the 35%.

Photo from the Gender Diverse Collection.

About the Author: Chanté Griffin is a writer living in Los Angeles. Her socially conscious work centers race, culture, and education. When she’s not writing, she’s either trying to read one of the two dozen books piled next to her nightstand, or pretending she’s really active on The Twitter .

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Not a professor? Not a problem: Eight Unexpected Careers in Higher Education https://www./not-a-professor-not-a-problem-eight-unexpected-staff-careers-in-higher-education/ https://www./not-a-professor-not-a-problem-eight-unexpected-staff-careers-in-higher-education/#respond Wed, 16 Oct 2019 23:10:21 +0000 https://www./?p=2972 Working in higher education isn’t just for researchers and teachers.

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Working in higher education isn’t just for researchers and teachers. Higher education institutions employ health care workers, event planners, marketing staff, and trade professionals; there are a whole host of jobs in the sector that you may not have considered. Higher education careers offer job security, generous benefits, and work-life satisfaction—all in a mission-driven environment that supports professional development and career ascension.

Here’s a run-down of some higher education jobs you may not have considered:

  • Trade positions

With vast amounts of buildings and services to look after, trade positions are in high demand on college and university campuses. Many higher education organizations have permanent positions for electricians, maintenance staff, plumbers, and engineers, rather than relying on contractors.

  • Logistics staff

When you’re looking for a job organizing events, colleges and universities might not be the first places that come to mind, but campuses put on an endless array of events that need planning and coordinating. Colleges and universities host alumni/ae reunions, prospective student weekends, and elegant fundraising events. Higher ed offers a regular cycle of events throughout the academic year.

  • Health and Wellness Center Staff

Many higher education institutions have wellness centers, which support the mental, physical and emotional health of students. Typical roles in this area may include Wellness Center Managers, counselors, therapists, nutritionists, and the associated administration.

  • IT Support

Every organization needs IT support, and higher education institutions are no exception. Working in IT within higher education, you’ll usually be part of a small, nimble team. As an IT expert, you’ll experience autonomy and the opportunity to lend your expertise to numerous departments.

  • Security Guard

How many people study and work at higher education institutions? Thousands, and that isn’t even counting all the visitors to campus. Campus security guards consider the safety and protection of people and property on a large scale. Security guards are a key part of the college and university ecosystem, from providing event support to responding to student emergencies. The number of security roles varies depending on campus size; small liberal arts colleges may hire only a few guards, while state universities may employ full police forces.

  • Designer

As a designer at a college or university, you may work on admissions materials, brand redesign, website development, alumni/ae association emails, or motion graphics. Careers in higher education are perfect if you prefer a steady, benefited job to freelance work.

  • Community Service Coordinator

Share your passion for giving back with students! Colleges and universities often hire staff to facilitate service learning opportunities for students, simultaneously connecting nonprofit organizations with enthusiastic volunteers and enabling students to learn more about the local community. Community Service Coordinators manage community service fairs, log students’ volunteer hours, scope out internship opportunities, and schedule “alternate” service-based spring breaks. If you’re a detail-oriented networker dedicated to the greater good, consider this career path.

  • Diversity and Inclusion Positions

Many colleges and universities rightly prioritize creating an equitable, inclusive environment for students, faculty, and staff from diverse backgrounds. Diversity and Inclusion Officers identify and implement inclusive workforce recruitment strategies, as well as provide cultural competency trainings for faculty and staff.

If you’d prefer to work closely with students, you can apply your passion for equity to roles like Director of Multicultural Education. Consider serving as an advisor to student clubs representing students with disabilities, and Black, Latino/a/x, LGBTQ+, Asian American and Pacific Islander, Native American, or international students.

Conclusion

With so many diverse positions, higher education is certainly not just for academics. In fact, higher education can be a great place for almost any role. Be sure to explore HERC’s 40,000+ open positions in higher education and related institutions!

About the Author:  is a Career Coach and owner of From Kids to Career, which was set up to support women who are returning to a career, or looking to move in a new direction after taking time out to raise a family. Nikki works with Mums to find their true passions and to re-build confidence that can be lost after a break from the workplace. She believes passionately that being a parent does not put you at the bottom of the pile when it comes to your career. Nikki owns CV writing company Confident CV and has 8 years’ experience working in Careers for Cardiff University.

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